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November 4th is here, and I missed my planned writeup… November 4, 2008

Posted by Mongo in Politics.
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I had hoped to have a new posting up by now, but due to a busy weekend, other efforts to the election cause and probably a bit too much beer while watching football, it’s been permanently delayed.  I would like to leave you with a brief writeup I received from a friend early this morning via Facebook…in not a lot of words she explains why she voted the way she did.  An excellent summary!

“I voted against higher taxes for those making over 250, oh, I mean 200, oh, I mean 150, oh, I mean 97, oh wait, I mean 42, against redistribution of wealth, against smearing those who ask questions, against the followers of the mainstream media, against Ayers, Wright, Flager, Davis, Rezko, Alinsky, Hollywood, against the waving the white flag, I voted for drilling, for keeping the coal industry alive, for nuclear power, for lower taxes, for smaller government, for keeping babies who survive abortions alive, I voted as an informed leader and not a misguided follower. I voted for the one who has experience, whose voted with his party 75% of the time, not the one whose voted with his party 97% of the time. I voted for true Change not delusional change. I voted for M-C-C-A-I-N because he’s the only one whose taken a hit for my country! We’ve already warned our employees that some may loose their jobs should The One who wants to fine businesses to pay for nationalized health care be elected.”

Thanks to Susan H. for the above!

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How Palin Changed the Game September 17, 2008

Posted by Mongo in Politics.
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This is an unoriginal post I am borrowing from CNN – giving full credit:
http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/09/15/rollins.gamechanger/index.html
It was about time I added something new to this blog and this was interesting enough to include here.  What a wise man!

 

How Palin changed the game

By Ed Rollins
CNN Contributor
September 15, 2008

It seems like just yesterday when Sen. Barack Obama impressed our troops in Kuwait by shooting his flawless three-pointer into the basket without hitting the rim. 

Two days later, he spoke to 200,000 Berliners. It looked like he could do no wrong and the campaign was only a formality on his way to inauguration day. 

But it wasn’t yesterday. It was the third week in July, and that’s a lifetime ago in presidential politics. 

Obama looked unbeatable then. He looked unbeatable the night of his acceptance speech before 85,000 cheering supporters. If victory went to the guy who could make the best speech or could win the schoolyard basketball game of “horse,” he was thought to be unstoppable. 

Then his world stopped with Sen. John McCain’s shocking selection of Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin for the vice presidential nomination. And over the last two weeks, the governor of Alaska has deflected the arc of Obama’s campaign. She can match his pretty words. The outdoor game has changed from “horse” to “moose,” and only one candidate in this race has shot “moose.” 

Obama’s campaign diminished itself by challenging her experience. The candidate who ranked 99th in Senate seniority, with one of the thinnest resumes ever when he began his presidential quest, looked foolish challenging a governor who made decisions every day while he was missing votes in the Senate running for president. 

The good news for Obama is the Europeans still want him to be our president. Unfortunately for him they don’t vote here, and the independent voters who do are shifting to McCain-Palin. 

The other good news for Obama is that this race is far from over. But he is not going to win by telling voters McCain is too old and doesn’t know how to use the Internet. Many of McCain’s supporters are old and could care less about the Internet. 

What the country wants to know is do these candidates understand what’s going on in their lives and in their neighbors’ lives, and are they willing to try and fix it. 

They want to get our soldiers home from Iraq as quickly as possible and leave that country as stable as it can be without us being there for another decade. They want someone who understands ordinary Americans are hurting and will try to find solutions to the economic mess we are in.

The leading “mainstream media” including ABC’s condescending Charlie Gibson and The New York Times’ Maureen Dowd have raced “North to Alaska” to find out what makes this woman tick. But alas, they show again and again that they just don’t get it. 

Nobody cares if Palin knows the Bush doctrine. I defy anyone to tell you what the Bush-Cheney strategy has been over the last seven years (other than getting re-elected) or what doctrine has been practiced by this “gang that can’t shoot straight.” And who cares? They are gone in 126 days. 

What the media doesn’t get is that Palin is one of us. She got to the top of the heap because she could relate to ordinary people, because she is ordinary people and through extraordinary efforts made it. 

She’s got kids; she worked her way through college (state college like most of us). Her husband is a working stiff. 

She started at the bottom and worked her way to the top by being better, not prettier. She did her job at the top by being smarter and tougher than the good old boys who stood in her way. 

One thing we do know is Palin is not going to look into the eyes of her neighbor across the Bering Sea and say Vladimir Putin’s an honest man. 

What she’s going to see is a fearless adversary who we need to be wary of. Equally important, if she is elected, she’s not going to be one of the boys in D.C. Behind her charm is a certain toughness. And that’s a good thing. 

The charisma of Palin was even evident on “Saturday Night Live” this weekend. There in the opening skit was Sarah Palin (played by her wonderful look-alike Tina Fey) opposite Hillary Clinton (played by “SNL” regular Amy Poehler). 

Even though it was a spoof, Palin stood out. Besides anyone who brings Fey back to “SNL” does the country and the show a big favor. 

Palin has certainly energized McCain’s campaign and drawn record crowds to boot. What Democrats didn’t realize is that Palin was not about getting Hillary’s voters. It was about energizing the base and getting independent voters. She has done that in spades. 

Both Obama and Palin have compelling stories and are great talents. In the end, the margin of victory may be the voters who say I like him, or I trust her. 

Of course, the big choice is McCain or Obama. But this is one race where the “veep” choice may really matter. The rise of Palin certainly has made this the most exciting presidential race in my lifetime. And I am one of those old guys who thought he had seen it all. 

After the marathon of the primaries, we are down to a 100-yard dash, and McCain’s got a 2-yard lead with Obama close on his tail. There’s a lot ahead before the finish line.